Wednesday, October 5, 2011

The rollercoaster of emotion

Today is the Insecure Writers Support Group post. This little gathering was started by Alex J. Cavanaugh. Please check out his blog and the others that are part of this. I also want to say, I'm trying to not ignore the blog, especially responding to your comments and comments, but folks I'm trying to get ready to query, at least I hope.

That's what has been on my mind. The query. Writing it sort of is, well let's face it, a pain, but that's not my full issue. It's getting the baby ready that's been quite the task. Between my two manuscripts, I decided to go back to the first one I wrote to query. I've been working on it for three years and the new one just needed to be away from me for a while (don't ask).

I went through changed the tense and did a comb through. Now it's out to betas and parts go to my CPs. Here's the thing. I feel like no matter what I do it will never be ready. I think for a second (in my gut), yes (fist pump), that was the last revision, but I get feedback and it's, well, it needs more of this and that and I totally agree. Now let me just say, I want the feedback and my CPs and betas are the best people on the planet because I don't want to send it out and it's not ready, but when will I know. When the comments to fix things end. Granted they are not major things (at least not yet), which is a blessing. They are minor, you know, simple and do able, but when will I know. Everyone keeps telling me gut feeling, but let me be honest, my gut doesn't always give me the right sign, at least I don't think so.

So, send me your thoughts. When do you decide a manuscript is ready for the big world of agents eyes?
Am I just being impatient?

Have a great day!

22 comments:

  1. When the comments that come back concern small things. When you've taken a break and come back to it and don't see what to fix. Sometimes it's gut. Find a fresh reader for the first 30 pages and see what the feedback is.

    ReplyDelete
  2. It's a tough question. Usually after I've edited a few times myself, then revised after CPs comments, then I read it from my kindle like a regular book. Then I feel I'm sick of it enough that I can't find anything else to fix. Of course, this doesn't mean a thing cuz I'm sure something else will be wrong with it... but at least if Ive given it my best shot, I'm hoping agents can determine whether it's enough to garner their interests.

    Good luck! If querying doesn't pay off this time around, set it aside for a month or two then come back with new eyes.

    ReplyDelete
  3. I haven't found that point of a manuscript being ready just yet, but I think you just know or are very content (but still happy) with the final draft.

    ReplyDelete
  4. I'm definitely not the best person to ask that question because I never know. Good luck with your querying.

    ReplyDelete
  5. I think that once you fix the problems your readers have identified and that you agree with, you are probably ready. I agree that it's very hard to know.

    ReplyDelete
  6. I have a novel that I thought was ready for an agent. I had to put it away for a while because of "life" and when I pulled it back out, I realized it was NOT what I had envisioned it to be.

    There's always going to be something to fix, I think. I also believe we just have to get our novel into the best shape we can get it and then have the faith to throw it out of the nest :)

    I wandered over from Alex's blog today :) Best of luck in your querying!

    Jen

    ReplyDelete
  7. I'm going through the same process right now. And thanks to beta readers I don't feel my writing is a complete failure. I think the more people that read it the more you will feel like it's ready. You kinda get a feel for it. As for writing a query, man does it suck. It's easier to construct a novel, really. :)

    ReplyDelete
  8. Good luck and best wishes getting the query ready, and your manuscript too. I think you're ready when you feel it's the best it can be (minus minor flaws perhaps). And your CPs can be good judges, too. :)

    ReplyDelete
  9. For me, it's just a gut feeling. I know that I've done all I can for the manuscript, and that's when I send it out to agents. Good luck!

    ReplyDelete
  10. Hi Christine. It's been a little while. We moved and then I had internet problems. I hear you loud and clear. I struggled with this same issue for years. What I can say is that people will always find something. Take a leap of faith and send the baby out. But if you're rejected, don't forget about e-publishing your book yourself.
    Good luck.
    Nancy
    N. R. Williams, Fantasy Author

    ReplyDelete
  11. When do I know? When I start changing things back to the way they were in the first draft. When I've come full circle, I'm done!

    ReplyDelete
  12. I'm just a hobby writer, without any publishing ambitions. I will probably self-publish my novel (for free) on amazon.com when it's finished, if it ever happens >:)

    Cold As Heaven

    ReplyDelete
  13. A manuscript is never really finished, but there is a point in time when you and your editor say its good to go. I'mm at that point now. Good luck to you!

    ReplyDelete
  14. It is ready when you know that you can no longer work on it anymore without that feeling of disgust inside. Once you get there...the manuscript is done. Time to start publishing it.

    ReplyDelete
  15. I agree with the others. When the fixes are tiny, or there is nothing that you agree with, then it's time to let go :-)

    ReplyDelete
  16. You'll never know for sure. I recently received feedback from an agent on my ms after winning the prize in a contest. She found tons of small things that my beta readers, CP, and I hadn't thought of. Why? Because that's what she does everyday. And when you add up all these little things, they make a huge difference in the story.

    But these are things that your agent will (hopefully) share with you once she falls in love with your ms. :)

    ReplyDelete
  17. It is a tough question, but if you have addressed all the issues people have brought up and that you agree need addressing, then you are probably ready. The fact is, you're always taking a chance.

    ReplyDelete
  18. Good luck with your query. I am entering the same stage. I cannot believe I once thought that most of the hard work was over once I finished the final draft.

    ReplyDelete
  19. I agree with Bob, and I think the keywords are: "the issues you agree need addressing."

    ReplyDelete
  20. I think you and I are on the same planet. I have two books in revision - a literary novel and a mystery. I've been really working the first for the last while - and I think it will be ready the end of this month - but I am not sure. My problem is that I usually send stuff out too soon so I'm being extra careful with this baby! My post today is about patience and revising. Jan Morrison

    ReplyDelete
  21. You know, I had thought Darkspell was totally ready. I had submitted it 3 times. When my book was finally picked up, I got cold feet and whipped out that baby and read it.

    I was embarrassed! I revamped my book--deleting over 8K words and cutting and pasting chapters and all the sort. It had a new facelift.

    I guess it's all in the readiness of your heart. I think the best way to combat such thing from happening again is for me to ask myself:

    If I read this MS now and it was about to go into the hands of (someone very important to you or someone who intimidates you), would I be proud?

    I feel it's hard to tell, but there's such thing as overkill, too.

    But one thing's for sure, always consider your critter partners' advice. ;)



    ♥.•*¨Elizabeth¨*•.♥

    ReplyDelete
  22. I agree with everyone; there will always be something to fix. That said, I'd keep doing betas until the remarks come back with little to nothing to say. Still, it can be hard to tell. Are you happy with it?

    Draven

    ReplyDelete