Wednesday, November 6, 2013

IWSG--Murky lake of writing

I totally missed last month. Sorry. I was away and totally forgot. There I said it. :) Thanks to Alex J. Cavanaugh for hosting and bringing writers together. Writing can be lonely and to have support can make you blossom. Don't forget to check out the other fine folks who participate.

Well, not much is going on here. I finally got through that murky stage where you think you'll never write again or have an idea (whether it's great or not is undetermined). It's scary. It seems I go through it every time I finish a manuscript. I finally say a novel is done and a small idea comes but the characters don't speak. I think it's the brain telling you to stop and take a break. The remedy is--you should. Revising a manuscript for months can have your brain in knots. It needs to unravel. Of course when you're in the moment, it feels like an eternity. The end. No more words will flow. Patience eats at you.

But there is a light. That little pin hole that's making it's way through the darkness. See it. It's there.You're a writer so no matter what that spark will return. And that's where I'm at. The spark returned. Yes, I had my typical fit of "I will never write again because I suck and no one will ever want this," but I took a couple of days to send the brain to the brain spa and finally things are starting to flow again.

I'm still scared though. My last novel is going through the query process and I can't help but feel like I'm repeating my first experience, but I must go through it and be persistent to get anywhere. Right?So in a nutshell, I'm back on track. For now. I can't say that I will be a regular blogger but I'm still here now and again.

How do you make it through the murky blank lake of writing?

Have a great day!!

12 comments:

  1. I'm fortunate in that I always seem to have many more ideas than hours in the day to write them - but I do go through periods of feeling uninspired, when just writing down some words feels like effort. I guess we just have to work through it, because the times when the words flow effortlessly make it all worthwhile...

    Best of luck with that novel!

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  2. Glad your back! Patience really does eat at you, doesn't it. My brain staged a strike all summer and just now decided to work...in spurts. Eh, I'll take what I can get.

    Good luck with the new idea!

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  3. I know that murky stage all too well! Now I keep a list of future book ideas to refer to in case I ever feel like I'll never have a good idea again. Taking a break is a good move, especially after editing, which can stop the inspiration. But it always comes back in the end! Best of luck with your new story! :)

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  4. I set goals and I keep them. Currently -- 2000 words a day. This seems to help me get it done. Good luck on your journey.

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  5. I've been in that murky stage. What brought me back was the support of friends--both online and in person. They kicked my butt and said you'd better start writing again. Setting goals works, too. Writing every day for a certain period of time whether you want to or not. Best wishes.

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  6. I always try to tell myself This too shall pass. Sometimes murkiness is really subconscious mulching. Hang in there.

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  7. I think taking a break is important - we need to refresh and renew ourselves from time to time. When I get stuck or frustrated with writing, I try and remember that I've been in a similar spot before and I'll get through it. :)

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  8. Breaks are good. Just can't let them become permanent.

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  9. I write too much. Well, I did... constantly. Now, I'm taking an honest break until next year.

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  10. You described that murky stage so well! Now I know I'm not the only one who goes through it and feels good to have company. Those recharging breaks are great but sometimes they make me feel guilty.

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  11. ROTATING PROJECTS. =) There's your answer. I have about 20 stories just sitting and waiting to be written, and several of them are in polar opposite genres. SO, when my brain needs a break, I switch it up. The key is to keep writing, but find something that refreshes you. Hope you're coming through the darkness!

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  12. Breaks are important because you come back refreshed. NaNoWriMo has been for getting back in the groove. Having the goal and time let is really helping me pump out a rough draft for the sequel to The Labyrinth Wall. And I suspect when that's done I'll shove it a way for quite a while to recover. lol :)

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